BENEFITS

POSTURE

BIOMECHANICS

HEALTH

STRENGTH

 

 

ROWHEELING

MUSCLES

PUSH-WHEELING

MUSCLES

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Up to 70 percent of manual wheelchair pushers develop chronic shoulder injury and pain, affecting their quality of life and reducing their ability to perform activities of daily living.

The problem with push-wheeling is that it relies on just two muscles to do all the propulsion work causing them to become overused and tight, destabilizing the shoulder joint.  Rowheeling distributes the propulsion work over a greater number of large muscles, resulting in less fatigue and overuse of individual muscles. Rowheeling muscles  stabilize the shoulder joint and retract the scapula, improving  posture and reducing the risk of Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

TEST DRIVE

IMPROVED POSTURE

IMPROVED POSTURE

One of the more immediate benefits users will experience when first using Rowheels REV wheels is an improvement in posture. The nature of the pulling motion is conducive to proper positioning of shoulders and back as it actively engages and strengthens the main back muscles that retract the scapula (shoulder blades), which minimizes the harmful effects associated with the all too common “sunken chest ” posture of wheelchair users.

"The (Rowheels) rowing motion makes wheelchair users sit up straight, allowing the diaphragm to function properly and significantly improve breathing."

     -J. Justus, SCI Nurse Educator - Zablocki VA

SUPERIOR BIOMECHANICS

Handrim force data showed that Rowheeling  can reduce the large compressive forces present at the beginning  of every pushing stroke. These forces are known to contribute to the occurrence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

• Shoulder Impingement Syndrome  is a condition caused by the repetitive impingement or “pinching” of the rotator cuff tendons. Over time, the rotator cuff tendons & surrounding tissue become inflamed, swollen and fraying or tearing can occur. Overuse of the chest and shoulder muscles involved in pushing a chair tend to de-stabilize the shoulder joint, putting users at a high risk for shoulder impingement.

•  Results from the Rancho Los Amigos (RLA) National Rehabilitation Center clinical study comparing rowheeling and push-wheeling  conclusively showed that rowheeling generates negligible (pulling up an incline) or negative (pulling on level ground) impingement forces by pulling the shoulder in the opposite direction.

"Rowheels present a unique solution to a common problem for wheelers--shoulder imbalance and damage."

  --New Mobility Magazine

THE ROWHEELS EFFECT

ROWHEELING VS PUSH-WHEELING

RANCHO LOS AMIGOS (RLA) STUDY RESULTS

Study Kinetics & Kinematics  Summary

Study Shoulder EMG  Summary

 Rowheels User Shoulder Pain  Case Study

Clinical Studies

"This (Rowheeling) may substantially protect the subacromial structures from impingement to prevent injury & pain, and preserve mobility, independence, and participation for individuals living with paraplegia."

-Pathokinesiology Lab, Rancho Los Amigos Nat'l Rehab Center (2017)

TRICEPS (LONG HEAD)

 

  • This muscle is one of the three heads of the Triceps and attaches to the scapula.
  • Plays an important role in stabilizing your shoulder.

 STRENGTH & BALANCE

Strengthen  upper back and shoulder muscles neglected or underused when push wheeling. These and other muscles are actively engaged in row wheeling and play a vital role in maintaining shoulder health, proper posture and facilitating self-transfers.

 Rowheeling

 Push-wheeling

 Rowheeling

 Push-wheeling

 Rowheeling

 Push-wheeling

 

 Rowheeling

 Push-wheeling

POSTERIOR DELTOID

 

• This muscle helps to pull your upper arm back. Under-used and  over-stretched in push-wheeling, strengthened it helps improve your posture.

RHOMBOIDS

 

  • These muscles stabilize  your shoulder blades (scapula).
  • Important muscles to strengthen to improve posture and protect the structures of your back and shoulder.
  • Underused and weakened when push-wheeling leading to nerve structures  pinched in the back, which causes pain in the shoulder and arm.

TRAPEZIUS

 

  • One of the major muscles of the back, it  works to retract (pull together) your shoulder blades.
  • Important muscles to strengthen to improve posture and protect the structures of your back and shoulder.
  • Underused and weakened when push-wheeling leading to nerve structures  pinched in the back, which causes pain in the shoulder and arm.

LATISSIMUS DORSI

 

  • This muscle helps to extend (pull backward) your shoulder.
  • One of the primary muscles used when lifting your buttocks   off a surface when transferring.
  • Improve your posture by strengthening this muscle

 Rowheeling

 Push-wheeling

EMG data in charts are from a Rancho Los Amigos National Research Center clinical study comparing rowheeling to push-wheeling muscle activity in wheelchair users. EMG results are for inclined/graded propulsion.

STAY HEALTHY & FIT

 

 

 

 

 

 

The idea of minimizing "effort" in manual wheelchair propulsion has  long been considered important mainly because push wheeling mechanics are bad for shoulder health. Because Rowheeling uses fundamentally different bio-mechanics, recruiting  several large upper body muscles and  using longer propulsion cycles (all good for your upper body), this may no longer be the case and a moderate increase  in a users cardio-pulmonary output could result in  long-term improvements in staminaendurance and overall cardiovascular health.

"... reverse wheeling might reduce the morbidity from overuse syndromes that develop from conventional forward wheelchair propulsion and might also serve as a tool for increasing the function of what might otherwise be relatively underused muscles."

-Salvi  (1998)

TOP

 Propulsion

Phase

 Recovery

Phase

 % of Max Voluntary

Contraction

 

 % of Cycle

 

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FITCHBURG, WI    53719

 

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